Help for making the perfect CV

CV versus Resume – describing the differences

What’s the difference between a Resume and a Curriculum Vitae (CV) – CV versus Resume?

This depends on where you are living and what you do for a living. There are as many explanations as there are different ways to use a CV versus Resume. There are although some simple rules in the discussion about a Resume versus a CV. Below we will try to enlighten you and give you an insight in the biggest differences.

Differences from Geographical point of view

If you are living in Europe including the United Kingdom, you will be able to use the terms CV and Resume rather interchangeably. There is little difference between them for people living in EU/UK. Although CV is more used than Resume here. If you live in the United States, the differences between a Resume and a CV can be big; you could say that a CV in a way is a special type of Resume.

In North America, most professionals in the business world would always have a Resume, being a two pager, consisting of the most important information about you and your expertise.

If you are working in more specialized areas like highly academic jobs within for instance research, medicine or similar, you would probably know a CV as a presentation of everything that you have done in your career including, all work experience, all educations, diplomas, honours, project you worked on and concepts created in your work. A CV will be a substantial longer document with all this information.

Differences in the Length of a CV / Resume

There are off course more specific differences then how many pages a CV/Resume would consist off. Depending on if you have for instance listings of scholarly accomplishments, publications (academic or business), articles this would be considered a CV. On the other hand more business achievements, skill, and credentials would be part of a Resume.

A basic guideline for a North American Resume would be a 1-2 page document consisting of the most important information, trying to sell you to potential employer. A North American CV, as used mostly for academic positions, will contain a substantial amount of information about everything that you have done, and all educations you have, and typically consist of several pages. Instead of a Resume which is the major accomplishments you have done the CV will have all the relevant and mandatory achievements and credentials.

In EU/UK, CVs can be very short or extremely long, depending on what you want to achieve and what you want to share. It is mostly depending on what position you are applying for.

It is rather confusing what to do

It can be confusing what to do, but instead of just trying to do the right thing, consider sending an email to the employer and simply ask for what level of details they are asking for and offer them further details on request. The only thing that can happen is that they will remember your name and this might give you an opportunity to be seen as professional because you asked what they were looking for – an interview opportunity might not be as far away as it was if you had not asked or if you had made the wrong assumptions and had send your CV/Resume in the wrong format / level of detail.

You should also be aware of the fact that the cover letter or the application will be seen as you trying to get the employer to read your CV/Resume to see if your competences are the right ones for the position.

Reference guide to the major differences between a CV and a Resume

North America

CV or Curriculum Vitae

  • Typically 6-15 pages (can be even bigger)
  • Usually used within academic or science
  • Complete listing of all achievement and experience
  • All elements are thoroughly described
  • Must be read thoroughly and not easy to get a simple overview

Resume

  • Typically 1-2 pages (max. 3 pages)
  • Usually used within business (administration)
  • Summary of accomplishments, credentials and achievements
  • Highlighting the important elements
  • Easy to get an overview

Europe

CV or Curriculum Vitae

  • Can range from a simple 1-2 pages to as long as necessary
  • Can be used in any area of business
  • Depending on what job you are applying for it can be detailed or simple

Resume

  • Not used in Europe

Main objective

The main objective of a CV or Resume is to give the employer all necessary information for him to create an overview of the person applying for a job so that he can decide whom to choose for an interview.

If ever in doubt, call the potential employer and ask them what they need then you already have a “toe” in the door.

Let Comoto help you do it the easy way

Remember that when using Comoto, you can always put all information about yourself and you work life in there and then just pick the most important for the position at hand. Easy and convenient create a specific CV / Resume for you. Have multiple CV / Resume ready for you to use in different application. You can even have them in different languages and different specifications. When using our CV Templates you can export to these and then make minor adjustments afterwards, taking the hassle out of making CV / Resumes.


Different writing styles of Curriculum Vitae

Different writing styles of Curriculum Vitae writing

It can be difficult to search around in the enormous amount of ideas, opinions and guides that is available today. Here you can find descriptions on the different writing styles of CVs that is recommended. There is not one optimal or correct version – the right style depends upon a lot of different factors and to find out what will work best for you, will be something you discover when you have tried different versions.

The final result should hopefully be that you gain full control of your CV and get the job of your dreams.

There are three styles you could choose from:

Functional Curriculum Vitae

This CV style is based mostly on your skills; it concentrates on the acquired skills you have gathered in the past, but also how you have used these skills in your previous positions. This style would be the best style to use if you have gaps in your employment history and/or want the recruiter to focus on your expertise/skills rather than discovering your visible gaps in your employment history. Not that you should withhold any important information, but you don’t need to make it obvious for the recruiter to see these negative facts in your CV.

You could say for whatever reason – if your skills / expertise are more important for a recruiter / headhunter than your qualifications or employment history, then a functional CV is the obvious choice.

Performance Curriculum Vitae

The performance Curriculum Vitae style mostly focuses on past performance. This is often the case if you’re a major achiever or very often seen in “sales” or “economic” related positions. With this type of CV you will focus the attention of the recruiter on your performance/achievement during each chronological job listed in your employment history. For example if you have been on the same step on the ladder for some years and achieved a lot at your work, but now you want to take the next step in your career. You can – by using this type of Performance CV – , show that you are a high performer and have achieved goals; that you have done this for some years and now you’re ready to take the next step. If the recruiter / headhunter recognize this, he knows you’re committed and will do the little extra “something” to achieve your next goals.

Targeted Curriculum Vitae

A targeted type of Curriculum Vitae would focus on the requirement of the vacant position and exclude most other unnecessary information that could distract the recruiter / headhunter from judging you to be the perfect match for the vacant position. Sometimes this could be the case if you’re from a completely different sector or your employment history is too diversified to be a perfect match. The skills and expertise you have acquired during your professional working experience has helped your professional capacity, but it is not directly applicable to the vacant position unless you illustrate why. That’s why in this case the best idea would be to have a CV targeted for that specific job.

Which CV type is the best?

Standards, guides or rules are almost not best used as they are, and this is especially the case with regards to your CV or Resume. The best thing that you can do is to take these good ideas and put them together to become what will be called a “Combination Curriculum Vitae”. This style of a CV is the most used format. You basically use a little of all the above styles when you are trying to make that perfect CV. It is rare that a clean type would be used, as the job vacancies are fairly complex and your employment history would need to be targeted every time to answer the requirements of the recruiter / headhunter.

Tailor make your CV to the job you want – and get it!

Tailor make your CV to the job you want – and get it!

Your CV is probably the most important part of your application to get the job of your dreams. The cover letter will be the place where you convince the recruiter/headhunter/company to read on, and read your entire CV.

A very good idea will be to Tailor make every job application with a Tailor made CV, if you want the job of your dreams, the employer should also read a “dream of a CV”.

The basic principle of your CV is to Tailor make it to the job:

  • Be sure to cover the most important job skills, qualifications, and experience in your CV.
  • Be certain that most parts of your CV relates to the job you apply for.
  • Use the same skills, experience, and qualifications description as in the job ad.
  • Ensure that your previous experience is clearly and relevant to the job application.

This is a lot easier to do when using Comoto, you can have several CV in the system and specialize them to the current application.

You have the basic material available from your basic CV (maybe your LinkedIn profile), and then you should just adapt that material to the wishes to you dream job.

An Outline of the basics in a CV is seen below:

Professional Summary

The professional summary is the part where you describe your overall motivation. Here you should describe that the current job would fit into your career choice. This is should show the employer that this job is the next step on your career ladder.

Skills

Skills are mostly seen as keywords in a job add; they are essential criterias that you have to have to fill this position. It is not a question if you have them all, most people don’t or just barely, but you must include all the required skills as much as possible. Highlight the skills where your expertise really supersedes the demands highlighted and mention the rest.

Work Experience

Your former work experience needs particular care and you should try to reuse some of the skills or goals explained in the job ad. Explain you experience very concise and clear, write the roles and tasks you had. Be sure to use the same wordings as in the requirements for this job.

Use several examples, and where it is possible show how your skills where developed and refined through your previous work experience. Make it extremely clear that you have gained extra expertise through your previous experience.

Achieved goals

Goals that you have achieved on top of your work experience for each job description are extremely positive, it shows that you aim for the goals the employer puts up and that you are dedicated to the relevant tasks. Try to use examples that are related to the new job application if possible.

Educations / Qualifications

A lot of job ads describe a certain set of required qualifications. You should try to provide qualifications that meet these requirements. Sometimes you have similar qualifications, try to convince them that they are good enough. Either do it by email beforehand so that you are sure that your qualifications are good enough. This also gives you the opportunity to have a talk with the employer before you send your CV.

Your qualifications need to be direct and to the point, and if the employer describes them very details, you do the same. Make it look like you’re obviously qualified and the best choice for the job.

As described above it is not that hard to make your CV targeted to the job your applying for. Using Comoto to do this is very easily, you have the opportunity to have several distinct CVs and you can change them and have as many as you like in your portfolio. You can even make them online versions, so that you can refer to a link if you talk with an interesting person.

How to avoid Identity Theft based on your CV information

How to avoid Identity Theft based on your CV information

Identity Theft, whether it is by gathering personal information or responding to the resumes and pretending to be a recruiter, it is a growing issue in the area of identity theft.

identity theftA few statistics and related information on identity theft

It is expected as many as 10 million Americans a year are victims of identity theft. The United States Department of Justice states that in 2010, 7% of all United States households had at least one member of the family at or over the age of 12 who has been a victim of some sort of identity theft. And as many things this is now spreading all over the world – that why you should consider (see more at http://s.tt/1bcsI).

But what happens when and afterwards your identity have been stolen!

  • 47% of victims have trouble getting credit or a loan as a result of identity theft
  • 19% of victims have higher credit rates and 16% have higher insurance rates because of identity theft
  • 11% of victims say identity theft has a negative impact on their abilities to get jobs
  • 70% of victims have trouble getting rid of (or never get rid of) negative information in their records

Identity thieves are using your information in a number of ways.

  • Uses your geographical information on the CV to go to your home (you show the address) and sort through your trash in the hope of obtaining more personal information or account numbers in trashed documents that were not shredded before being thrown away or even stealing new post as it comes in.
  • Use phone and job details it to call your former employer claiming to be a potential new employer checking references in order to get more information.
  • Use your CV information to search for you in public records databases in order to find more detailed information.
  • Use is to contact you as a job seeker and pretending to be a recruiter asking for more sensitive information like Social Security Number, Bank account or driver’s license numbers claiming they need it for background checks for potential employers.

How to avoid it – consider what you show and where to whom. Read more here

 

 

Tailor CV to the job you want – and get it!

Tailor CV to the job you want – and get it!

Your CV is probably the most important part of your application to get the job of your dreams. The cover letter will be the place where you convince the recruiter/headhunter/company to read on, and read your entire CV.

A very good idea will be to tailor every job application with a tailor-made CV, if you want the job of your dreams, the employer should also read a “dream of a CV”.

The basic principle of your CV is to tailor it to the job:

  • Be sure to cover the most important job skills, qualifications, and experience in your CV.
  • Be certain that most parts of your CV relates to the job you apply for.
  • Use the same skills, experience, and qualifications description as in the job ad.
  • Ensure that your previous experience is clearly and relevant to the job application.

This is a lot easier to do when using Comoto, you can have several CV in the system and specialize them to the current application.

You have the basic material available from your basic CV (maybe your LinkedIn profile), and then you should just adapt that material to the wishes to you dream job.

An Outline of the basics in a CV is seen below:

Professional Summary

The prof. summary is the part where you describe your overall motivation. Here you should describe that the current job would fit into your career choice. This is should show the employer that this job is the next step on your career ladder.

Skills

Skills are mostly seen as keywords in a job add; they are essential criterias that you have to have to fill this position. It is not a question if you have them all, most people don’t or just barely, but you must include all the required skills as much as possible. Highlight the skills where your expertise really supersedes the demands highlighted and mention the rest.

Work Experience

Your former work experience needs particular care and you should try to reuse some of the skills or goals explained in the job ad. Explain you experience very concise and clear, write the roles and tasks you had. Be sure to use the same wordings as in the requirements for this job.

Use several examples, and where it is possible show how your skills where developed and refined through your previous work experience. Make it extremely clear that you have gained extra expertise through your previous experience.

Achieved goals

Goals that you have achieved on top of your work experience for each job description are extremely positive, it shows that you aim for the goals the employer puts up and that you are dedicated to the relevant tasks. Try to use examples that are related to the new job application if possible.

Educations / Qualifications

A lot of job ads describe a certain set of required qualifications. You should try to provide qualifications that meet these requirements. Sometimes you have similar qualifications, try to convince them that they are good enough. Either do it by email beforehand so that you are sure that your qualifications are good enough. This also gives you the opportunity to have a talk with the employer before you send your CV.

Your qualifications need to be direct and to the point, and if the employer describes them very details, you do the same. Make it look like you’re obviously qualified and the best choice for the job.

As described above it is not that hard to make your CV targeted to the job your applying for. Using Comoto to do this is very easily, you have the opportunity to have several distinct CVs and you can change them and have as many as you like in your portfolio. You can even make them online versions, so that you can refer to a link if you talk with an interesting person.

CV Tips – CV Layout / Design of CV is important

CV Layout and Design of CV is important

Maintain different version of your CV text and CV layout, a short one as an appetizer, a general one to include most of your skills and experience and a long one which includes everything you have made.

These different versions should look alike so that you can start out with the short version and send a more detailed version if you are asked to do so. It is also useful to have online versions of your CV. Using Comoto you have that automatically, you can even put a password on them so that only people you want to see them will be able to see them.

There is not only on advice here when talking about layout and design. For instance, within the financial sector a layout with funny graphical details in it will be a show stopper in many cases, they would in many cases see that as unprofessional. On the other hand if you are working within Marketing/Branding a basic textual CV would be seen and boring. So it is important for you to make the design layout reflect you as a person and the area you are working in.

With Comoto you can do this automatically, you have all you detailed information in the database and you can have different layout for different positions or companies. Just by the press of a button you have a new design.

The Comoto Team

Comoto‘s aim is to become “The Central Place” where you can create, clone, copy, manage, backup and distribute your CV and Cover letters fast and easy. To create your first Comoto CV, signup for free and just add your data (or use one of the many easy import features), pick one of our special designed templates, preview your CV and finally export to your favourite format (.DOC – .PDF – .PNG) or publish it in a Web Profile (Public/Private). Now you are ready to have full control of your CV. Notice other unique features – like multiple CVs – a few clicks and you can create a CV targeted for a specific job or Export to many different formats.

Target CV to the job you want – and get it!

Target CV to the job you want – and get it!

Your CV is probably the most important part of your application to get the job of your dreams. The cover letter will be the place where you convince the recruiter/headhunter/company to read on, and read your entire CV.

A very good idea will be to target every job application with a tailor-made CV, if you want the job of your dreams, the employer should also read a “dream of a CV”.

The basic principle of your CV is to target it to the job:

  • Be sure to cover the most important job skills, qualifications, and experience in your CV.
  • Be certain that most parts of your CV relates to the job you apply for.
  • Use the same skills, experience, and qualifications description as in the job ad.
  • Ensure that your previous experience is clearly and relevant to the job application.

This is a lot easier to do when using Comoto, you can have several CV in the system and specialize them to the current application.

You have the basic material available from your basic CV (maybe your LinkedIn profile), and then you should just adapt that material to the wishes to you dream job.

An Outline of the basics in a CV is seen below:

Professional Summary

The prof. summary is the part where you describe your overall motivation. Here you should describe that the current job would fit into your career choice. This is should show the employer that this job is the next step on your career ladder.

Skills

Skills are mostly seen as keywords in a job add; they are essential criteria’s that you have to have to fill this position. It is not a question if you have them all, most people don’t or just barely, but you must include all the required skills as much as possible. Highlight the skills where your expertise really supersedes the demands highlighted and mention the rest.

Work Experience

Your former work experience needs particular care and you should try to reuse some of the skills or goals explained in the job ad. Explain you experience very concise and clear, write the roles and tasks you had. Be sure to use the same wordings as in the requirements for this job.

Use several examples, and where it is possible show how your skills where developed and refined through your previous work experience. Make it extremely clear that you have gained extra expertise through your previous experience.

Achieved goals

Goals that you have achieved on top of your work experience for each job description are extremely positive, it shows that you aim for the goals the employer puts up and that you are dedicated to the relevant tasks. Try to use examples that are related to the new job application if possible.

Educations / Qualifications

A lot of job ads describe a certain set of required qualifications. You should try to provide qualifications that meet these requirements. Sometimes you have similar qualifications, try to convince them that they are good enough. Either do it by email beforehand so that you are sure that your qualifications are good enough. This also gives you the opportunity to have a talk with the employer before you send your CV.

Your qualifications need to be direct and to the point, and if the employer describes them very details, you do the same. Make it look like you’re obviously qualified and the best choice for the job.

As described above it is not that hard to make your CV targeted to the job your applying for. Using Comoto to do this is very easily, you have the opportunity to have several distinct CV’s and you can change them and have as many as you like in your portfolio. You can even make them online versions, so that you can refer to a link if you talk with an interesting person.

11 steps to a successful CV

11 steps to a successful CV

Your CV is like a showroom; it should display your qualification to recruiter or head-hunters as they skim your CV. How do you make them choose your CV? And how do the recruiters / head-hunters turn a pile of CV into just a few CV’s, including yours?

Follow these eleven simple tips to ensure your CV is among the few left when the recruiter goes back to his customer and says “I just found the perfect match!”

1. Find the type of CV wanted

The first thing you should do is to find out what form and style the company wants for the CV or what form and style is normally used in your line of work. Is it a two-pager, is it chronological? If you don’t know, then just call the recruiter and he/she will happily guide you.

2. Keep it concise

Your CV should be short and to the point, leave out unnecessary filling. Recruiters don’t want to spend a lot of time on reviewing a long CV – if you send them an encyclopaedic drilldown of your life to date, they won’t find the information they want. Keep it short and to the point and save the details for the interview.

3. Target your CV to the job

Take the time necessary to adapt your CV to each position you apply for. Get some background information on company and use the keywords in the job ad to find out which skills you should use and which you should leave out.

4. Personal statement

Tie your experience and work history to the vacant position so that the recruiter / head-hunter can see the connection between why he should choose you. This is best done with a brief personal statement to be sure the recruiter / head-hunter sees the connection.

5. Leave out gaps

Recruiters’ don’t like gaps – if they spot a gap they will either dig deeper to find out what is this al about (more work for them) or they will just go on to the next in the pile of interesting CV’s. If you have a gap, make a positive thing out of it, give them extra experience or another twist on the gap.

6. CV must be up-to-date

Be sure that your CV is always up-to-date, especially if it is an online CV it must always be up-to-date. Regardless of whether you’re actively job seeking, every time you gain some experience or otherwise have information for your CV, make the changes right away.

7. No mistakes and misspellings in your CV

Don’t let the recruiter / head-hunter dismiss your CV just because you made a mistake or misspelled something. Many recruiters / head-hunters see these types of mistakes as severe. They say “If you can’t even spell right or made stupid mistakes, you probably haven’t even read the CV after you wrote it.” Use a spellchecker on the text and have someone you trust, proofread it to get a second opinion.

8. Only the truth and nothing but the truth

Never ever tell a lie in your CV as many recruiters / head-hunter use references and their network to check the facts of your CV. If you tell a lie and it is discovered afterwards it is a reason to dismiss you and nobody wants that. Many times any inconsistencies are also discovered in the job by a simple Google search or at the interview and there it will be probed if they find any “lies”.

9. Remember numbers and facts

If you can – it is always a good idea to back up your achievements with numbers. Writing your work experience and achievements, don’t just tell the recruiter you increased profit; show them how much: EBIT increased 78% over 2 years, with a growth rate of sales on 30% over the same period.

10. Layout / design matters

Use a CV template that is in line with your profile. Marketing people can make something very chick and creative, but please if you are an accountant please choose a CV template that signals the right things. It all depends on the sector and what is normal, don’t use the design to make you standout in a negative manner.

11. Remember to use sector specific keywords

Today CV’s are many times online profiles, or CV’s that will be put into a recruiter / head-hunter internal IT systems for indexing and searching capabilities. These systems make use of keywords to search for, just like Google like specific keywords recruiters do so to. Make the keywords 100% aligned with the vacant position and also have some extra in there that can be the extra something to make you stand out from the crowd.

CV Checklist – better safe than sorry

CV checklist

This is a CV checklist to be sure that the right information is in your CV. Certain types of information must be included to give you the best possible chance, getting through to the important interview. A lot of recruiters / head-hunters are increasingly using online CV databases to search for potential candidates; including the right type of information will guide them to your profile. Below you can see a checklist you can use to be sure that you are in the game to get the job of your dreams.

Personal data

This is the standard data about you as a person; name, address, phone numbers, email address and soon. You might also wish to include details about your nationality, age and driving licence, it all depends what country you live in, for instance in the UK it is not advised to write ones age, due to age discrimination.

Education

Include information about your education, this includes your education but also if you have had some courses or seminars of an educational nature. Specific skills IT knowledge, languages skills and try to state which level it is on (basic, intermediate or advanced level). You should also include keywords used in the job ad for the position your interested in because recruiters will use keywords these to filter CV when searching in databases.

Work experience

You should list your work experience in reverse chronological order with the most recent most recent experience first. Use keywords to describe your experience, do it in a positive languages, using the right keywords for that sector and finally highlight your key achievements.

Skills

A section on your major skills can be used in some areas, these skills are skills acquired through you work experience and will typically be skills where you have achieved good results ore skills that you want to use in the future. The idea here is to show what you have learned in your work. Education is one thing, but the skills acquired when working is also extremely important.

References

It should not be necessary to have all the details on your referees in your CV, but you should state the basic information and that details are available on request. If you already have asked a former colleague if he would like to be a referee for you, then you can disclose his details, but if not always remember to get the permission to use them prior to handling over the contact information.

Hobbies

You should persuade the recruiter / head-hunter with your skills, experience and education. But sometimes it can be a good thing to show the recruiter / head-hunter that there are other things in life than work. Being a “whole” person resting in yourself can be achieved by disclosing your Hobbies or other interests. It gives a more complete rounded picture of a candidate.

This is just meant to be a mere idea of a checklist, sometimes regional practises or special rules in a special sector can apply, in that case use your common sense and use this list as a guideline and use your own checklist as well.


Comoto uses the CEFR standard for language proficiency

Common European Framework of Reference for Languages – language proficiency

Language proficiency: In 1991 the Swiss Federal Authorities held an Intergovernmental Symposium in Rüschlikon, Switzerland, on “Transparency and Coherence in Language Learning in Europe: Objectives, Evaluation, Certification”. This symposium found that a Common European Framework for languages was needed to improve the recognition of language qualifications and help teachers co-operate, eventually leading to improved communication and cooperation generally in Europe.

Development of language proficiency

As a result of the symposium, the Swiss National Science Foundation set up a project to develop levels of proficiency, to lead on to the creation of a “European Language Portfolio” – certification in language ability which can be used across Europe.

Levels

The Common European Framework divides learners into three broad divisions which can be divided into six levels:

A Basic Speaker

A1 Breakthrough or beginner

A2 Waystage or elementary

B Independent Speaker

B1 Threshold or pre-intermediate
B2 Vantage or intermediate

C Proficient Speaker

C1 Effective Operational Proficiency or upper intermediate
C2 Mastery or advanced

The CEFR describes what a learner is supposed to be able to do in reading, listening, speaking and writing at each level.

Level Description
A1 Can understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases aimed at the satisfaction of needs of a concrete type. Can introduce him/herself and others and can ask and answer questions about personal details such as where he/she lives, people he/she knows and things he/she has. Can interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to help.
A2 Can understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment). Can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters. Can describe in simple terms aspects of his/her background, immediate environment and matters in areas of immediate need.
B1 Can understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. Can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken. Can produce simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest. Can describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes & ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.
B2 Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in his/her field of specialisation. Can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party. Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.
C1 Can understand a wide range of demanding, longer texts, and recognise implicit meaning. Can express him/herself fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. Can use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes. Can produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organisational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices.
C2 Can understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. Can summarise information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. Can express him/herself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in the most complex situations.

CV Tips – Spell Check

Spell Check

One thing you should do before you send your CV/Resume, is to make sure you give it a spell check. You can use build in version in your word processing software.

After you have done this spell check it, have someone else read the CV. Just to make certain that you haven’t given wrong information or to ensure that the text is readable and easy to understand. A spell checker can easily give you a wrong “security” in the sense that it doesn’t check for wrong words used in a sentence. It is also important that you get a second opinion on your wordings and the way you write things.

Leave your CV/Resume alone, and read it again after a while to be sure nothing slipped your eyes. As your CV could be responsible of you getting the job of your dreams it is better to be safe than sorry.

In our application at Comoto we are constantly working to improve the services, and one project in our pipeline is to include a build in spell checker in Comoto, we will give you information when this has been finalized.

 

The Comoto Team

Comoto‘s aim is to become “The Central Place” where you can create, clone, copy, manage, backup and distribute your Resume and Cover letters fast and easy. To create your first Comoto Resume, signup for free and just add your data (or use one of the many easy import features), pick one of our special designed templates, preview your Resume and finally export to your favorite format (.DOC – .PDF – .PNG) or publish it in a Web Profile (Public/Private). Now you are ready to have full control of your Resume. Notice other unique features – like multiple resumes – a few clicks and you can create a Resume targeted for a specific job or Export to many different formats.

 

3 different types of career changes and how to do it !

3 different types of career changes

Why would you have to change your current job?

There are 3 main reasons normally used for changing you career.

  1. Involuntary career change
  2. Normal career change
  3. Major career change

Involuntary career change

As it says – “Involuntary” – it is out of your hands, you might be the one making the decision to make the career change, but it is what you could call a “force majeure” or a “greater force” decision. Below you can see examples of this:

  • Your new job was not as agreed in the contract
  • Redundancy caused by merger, acquisition, takeover
  • Redundancy caused by outsourcing to more competitive countries/companies
  • Redundancy caused by loss of market share or position
  • Conflict with new management after a merger or takeover; there is simply not enough chemistry between the new parties who needs to work together

“Involuntary” career change demands the best of you and your network. Sometimes it is frustrating and you would say “Why me!”. But the only thing that works in that situation is to start to plan the changes ahead in a rationally way. Before the situation becomes unbearable for you start planning your next moves and try to focus on the future instead of the past. Use you past positively and make your CV the best CV around. Activate you network and have all your listening antennas up and ready to tune in to possible opportunities. If you manage to get through this hard period of your life, you will get some valuable experience of ”change management” that would be an asset to a new employer and you can certainly talk about having coped effectively with crisis!

Normal career change

The most common career change scenario you probably already have experienced is that you believe and wants to have a better job with more rewards within your line of work. You are unsatisfied with your current employer who has for instance in salary and bonus issues dragged his feet and maybe a new company offers you more for your line of expertise. The first thing you should do is to take control of your CV and make it updated and exactly right for your next job. Then start networking, scanning for possible jobs, begin approaching agencies and headhunters. What you need is an up-to-date CV and a perfect cover-letter that explains what you are trying to achieve, and why you think you are ready to do a career move. These should be prepared before you make actually contact with any new employer or headhunter. This also needs to be done for you to be sure why and what you want and not just take the first available position you find. Have a look in our other Comoto CV Tips to get some ideas on how to write the perfect CV and remember to target your CV to the actual job at hand.

Major career change

If you want make a complete change in your occupation – after having for instance finished a new education, returning after motherhood, returning from a period abroad, served in the military or you are just feed up with the sector you work in and want to make a major shift into something that you will find more interest in, this will demand all your senses and competences to do so, and especially in the case you need to do this in a rational and controlled manner. You will also need to do this as if it was an exercise or project. It is not something that cannot be done overnight or just by making a new CV and then go job hunting as you go away from safe haven and enter unchartered waters therefore proper planning is a must. You might have to do this over time and get your network working for you, but be aware not to disclose anything for people who might become a whistleblower and go behind your back. Because then a simple wish to try something new can lead to an “involuntary” career change.

Good luck in your career change

Curriculum Vitae and CV Vocabulary

Curriculum Vitae and CV Vocabulary:

CV (Curriculum Vitae)

A summary of your work experience and education, used for job applications

Resume

American English term for a Resume (typical a two-pager – often smaller than a CV)

Cover Letter

The letter you send with your CV, with the reasons for you to apply for the vacant position with this particular company

Reference

A formal letter from an employer, describing your character, ability and experience

Referee

The named person who provide a reference for you

Background

The whole of one’s education, training and experience

Bi-lingual

Able to use two languages with equal ease

Mother tongue

The language first learned by a person; native language

Native speaker

A person having a specified native language: a native speaker of English

Career

An occupation or profession, esp. one requiring special training, followed as one’s lifework

Work Experience

Knowledge or practical wisdom gained from what one has observed, encountered, or undergone in the work life

Date of birth

The day on which one was born, usually as day/month/year

Education

Training and instruction at school, university etc.

Interest

An activity outside work in which one is interested or concerned; hobby

Job objective

The kind of work or challenge that one is looking for

Miscellaneous

Various; mixed [e.g.: nationality, languages spoken, marital status]

Native language

The language one first learned to speak; mother tongue

Qualifications

The education and experience that make one suitable for a particular job

Skill

Ability, expertness or aptitude in a particular activity [e.g.: language skill]

Training

The process of learning a particular SKILL [e.g.: sales training]

Position

A post of employment: a position in a bank

Vacancy

An unoccupied position or office: a vacancy in the company

Candidate

A person who seeks a job at a company: a candidate for the sales vacancy

Job interview

An interview to determine whether an applicant/candidate is suitable for a position of employment

Applicant

A person who seeks a job at a company: an applicant for the vacant position

Certificate

A document serving as evidence or as written testimony, as of status, qualifications, privileges, or the truth of something

Diploma

A document given by an educational institution conferring a degree on a person or certifying that the person has satisfactorily completed a course of study

Curriculum Vitae

Is a latin expression which can be loosely translated as “course of life”
Background Check Is the process of looking up and compiling criminal records, commercial records and financial records (in certain instances such as employment screening) of a candidate before employing him/her

The Comoto Team

Read more

Can your CV stand the LinkedIn Buzzword test

Overused buzzword – can your CV stand the LinkedIn buzzword test

Buzzwords has been around for ages, remember the buzzword bingo game, LinkedIn has examined 85 million profiles for the most clichéd and overused phrases and has come up with the “2010 LinkedIn Top 10 overused buzzwords” in LinkedIn Profiles in the USA.

1.  Extensive experience
2.  Innovative
3.  Motivated
4.  Results-oriented
5.  Dynamic
6.  Proven track record
7.  Team player
8.  Fast-paced
9.  Problem solver
10. Entrepreneurial

Can your CV stand the test of these overused words ?

Or if you don’t live in the USA:

* Dynamic – Brazil, India, Spain
* Motivated – UK
* Innovative – France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands

Remember that Comoto can help you create a fast CV from your LinkedIn profile – and help you maintaining multiple CV’s. With our unique inheritance feature in Comoto you only need to change the wordings in one place if you have the same wording/phrases in multiple CV’s.

This makes it easier for you to avoid being ruled out in the “buzzword bingo game” by using a full CV and not just your profile in a relationship database.

Read more

CEFR compared to North American language proficiency standards

CEFR compared to North American language proficiency standards

Comoto uses the European CEFR standard in language proficiency. Having more and more users from North America we are looking at the possibility to have more than CEFR as the language proficiency scale in our CV application. Until we have finished that project we have found the table below to clarify for the users the major differences in the different proficiency standards out there.

The following table establishes equivalences between the CEFR and some North American standards.

The standards compared are:

  1. The CEFR itself
  2. Interagency Language Roundtable Scale (ILR, United States)
  3. American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Languages Proficiency Guidelines (ACTFL)
  4. New Brunswick Oral Proficiency Scale (NB OPS, English and French only)
  5. Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB, English and French only)
  6. Public Service Commission of Canada Second Official Language Proficiency Levels (PSC, English and French only)
CEFR ILR ACTFL NB OPS CLB PSC
A1 0/0+/1 Novice (Low/Mid/High) Unrated/0+/1 1/2 A
A2 1+ Intermediate (Low/Mid/High) 1+/2 3/4 B
B1 2 Advanced Low 2+ 5/6 C
B2 2+ Advanced Mid 3 7/8
C1 3/3+ Advanced High 3+ 9/10
C2 4 Superior 4 11/12
4+/5

The Comoto Team

Comoto‘s aim is to become “The Central Place” where you can create, clone, copy, manage, backup and distribute your CV and Cover letters fast and easy. To create your first Comoto CV, signup for free and just add your data (or use one of the many easy import features), pick one of our special designed templates, preview your CV and finally export to your favourite format (.DOC – .PDF – .PNG) or publish it in a Web Profile (Public/Private). Now you are ready to have full control of your CV. Notice other unique features – like multiple CV’s – a few clicks and you can create a CV targeted for a specific job or Export to many different formats.

CV-Resume-Database

Do you need a fast CV or the right CV?

Do you need a fast CV or the right CV?

Need a fast CV now or a well considered and specific targeted for that one particular job you want! – by the way this is what we call a Comoto CV clone.

Seeking a new job is not just about sending the usual and standard CV you made ages ago – most of the time it requires an evaluation and maybe a Curriculum Vitae created/build especially for that particular job opening.

Sometimes you just need a fast CV, here and now because you have been contacted by a recruiter or found a job opening through your network – with Comoto it is a matter of seconds to send one of your CV’s (and if you don’t have one yet you can import it from LinkedIn or Europass in less than 32 seconds our latest tests shows).

But as mentioned most of the time you have enough time to consider and prepare the optimal strategy for the application and accompanying CV – what is important for you in the job, why are you the perfect candidate, which are the skills needed, which are the skills to emphasise – are some of the questions to ask yourself. Use an existing Comoto CV to create a clone (our word for a copy as you copy sorry clone everything – not just the text but also the structure, etc.) change and add to ensure all the considerations you have made in advance are covered – save and test several templates – which designs fits you and the situations best (if none send us your ideas) – before you pick the optimal one.

The 10 best tips for the job interview

The 10 best tips for the job interview
10 Tips for you, so that you can prepare your answers beforehand and get the job of your dreams. There is more than just sending the perfect CV or Resume and a good application. You have to prepare before you are ready for the Job Interview.

  1. Good style
    Get there on time, dress appropriately and behave as the guest you are.
  2. Think about your body language
    Think about the body language, straighten your back, give a firm handshake and look the interviewer in the eyes.
  3. Be prepared
    Remember to bring the job ad, your application, your CV and other relevant documents. Note the name of the contact person and a telephone number to be able to ask for the right person at the reception and know who you are visiting. If possible find relevant information about the person you are about to meet.
  4. Remember the gaps in your CV or Competence
    If you have some gaps in your CV or in your competences, remember that the recruiter / headhunter will ask for these gaps. Be prepared and have an answer ready for the question you probably will be asked.
  5. Know the company
    Do some research on the company, know more than just what’s in the job ad. Prepare some question so that they can see that you know more then what has been disclosed to you.
  6. Prepare for your answers  for the normal interview questions
    The question you will get to the job interview is of course depending on the job’s sector and type, responsibilities and tasks, but be sure to be prepared for the basic question, like:

    • Tell us about yourself?
    • Why are you applying for this job?
    • Which expectations do you have to the job or the tasks?
    • What are your strongest areas? – for instance have some concrete examples on your successes or your strongest competences.
    • What are your weak areas? – have some examples ready on what you think is hard, and how you cope with these challenges.
    • What do you expect from an employer / manager?
    • Why should we choose you for the job?
    • What are your career goals on medium to long term?
    • What are your expectations to your salary?
    • Do you have any further questions?
  7. Prepare your questions
    • Focus your question and on what is asked from you.
    • What are the most important tasks in the job?
    • Which possibilities are there for further development of your competences?
    • How is the culture in the company?
    • What do they appreciate in an employee?
    • Why should I choose this job?
    • Why would you like to work here?
    • Who will be my manager and which colleagues will I have the closet working relations with?
    • Do you have an introductory course for new employees?
  8. Avoid negative stories
    Negativity don’t sell, remember not to talk negative about former managers or colleagues. If you have had some bad experiences, try to turn it into something positive. What did you learn from this negative experience?
  9. Be present and participate on equal terms with the interviewer
    Be present, listen to the question and be honest and give them your best answer, show them that your dedicated. Newer tell a lie, it will get back to you like a boomerang.
  10. If possible offer the references
    If you decide to disclose your references, remember to have them prepared before the interview.

Final question
At the end of the interview you can always ask for what is the process going forward, will I have to take a test of some kind? When can I expect to be contacted again?

The Comoto Team

Comoto‘s aim is to become “The Central Place” where you can create, clone, copy, manage, backup and distribute your CV and Cover letters fast and easy. To create your first Comoto CV, signup for free and just add your data (or use one of the many easy import features), pick one of our special designed templates, preview your CV and finally export to your favourite format (.DOC – .PDF – .PNG) or publish it in a Web Profile (Public/Private). Now you are ready to have full control of your CV. Notice other unique features – like multiple CV’s – a few clicks and you can create a CV targeted for a specific job or Export to many different formats.